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The Reciprocity Effect

Living A Creative Life Through Analogue Photography & Book Arts

SALT PRINTING IN THE SUN

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© Quinton Gordon

It’s definitely been a very Good Friday… out making salt prints in the warm spring sun!

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Digital negative from Leica M-Monochrom

Print: 6x9 inches

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VISUAL JOURNALS - PART II

© 2014 Quinton Gordon

Such a fun, creative and cathartic process… definitely offers away to step outside your usual framework.

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A WALK HOME / VISUAL JOURNALLING

© 2014 Quinton Gordon 

I’m teaching a new 10 week class on Visual Journalling at the Intercultural Association of Greater Victoria… and enjoying doing my own journal alongside the students.

Cameras for this project have been generously provided by Fujifilm Canada.

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SEMETKO GRAVURE PRINTS

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Diana is hard at work on a commission to produce a limited edition of photopolymer gravure prints to accompany the Collector Edition of Craig Semetko’s new book India Unposed, launching next week at the Leica Gallery in Los Angeles.

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Inking the plates.

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Registering the plate on the press bed.

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Freshly pulled print.

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To learn more about our photopolymer gravure printing services and workshops, visit the Luz Studios website.

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NORTH OF 49

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© 2014 Quinton Gordon / 8x20 inch Diptych

For the past few months, Diana and I have been developing a project inspired by our desire to simplify how we live, return to core values, and reconnect with nature. Combined with our growing concern for the environment, and the need for affirmative local action we are compelled to respond.

As visual artists, our first line of response is investigation, an exploration of the issues at hand and of our role and perspective on them. Once we begin to get an understanding of what it is that drives our focus, the next task is to figure out how to articulate our findings through our medium of photography.

To speak eloquently through a visual language requires that we work to understand the tools and visual vocabulary that will most effectively offer some insight and relevance to us as artists.

For decades I have worked off and on with large format cameras. In the mid 1990’s I started experimenting with multiple negative images from my 4x5 camera combining two, and three negatives into diptych, triptych interpretations of the landscape and in the last couple years our work in the collodion wet plate process has brought the world of large format actively back into my practice. 

With this project, my early investigations were much like sketches as I wandered with my 35mm Leica, easily able to respond to what I saw. But as much as I love the simplicity of working with a small camera, the more I worked, the more I felt unsatisfied by the impressionistic nature of the small film format and I was compelled to make images with greater detail. Frequently the images also felt constrained, limited by the confines of a single frame, so gradually I started packing my 4x5 camera along on our excursions.

Now 4x5 is a wonderful format, it’s relatively easy to carry and yet it offers a substantial negative that when well scanned will deliver far greater levels of detail then required, but as I reviewed film from these outings something was not sitting quite right.

This project, which we have given the working title of North of 49, investigates the cultural landscape of Vancouver Island, with a particular emphasis on the potential for significant social and environmental impacts based on the conflict between resource extraction, agriculture, fisheries, and the general state of the environment and economy.

As a photographer, I feel that the images I make for this project need to resonate with significant clarity while at the same time, allowing me to interpret what I find. Additionally it’s important to consider how the work will be accessed and how I can integrate the message into the physical aspects of the medium.

As a result, I’m choosing to use my 8x10 camera to make diptych, and triptych images along with portraits. Why? Well partially because to do so demands a significant amount of physical effort and this is important to the concept I’m exploring, but also because this seemingly cumbersome choice also carries with it a kind of simplicity, one imposed by the physical limitations and intellectual demands of working with deliberation.

After making some initial 8x20 inch work prints, I’m convinced of the format that I’ll work in, and my only remaining question is if the images will be unique tintype plates, or negatives that I can make small editions of salt prints from…?

More updates on this project as we work more deeply into it over the coming months.

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STUDIO DAYS

© Diana Millar

We are hard at work in the studio this week… well, most of us are.

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NOWHERE IS A PLACE

© Quinton Gordon

And it has a big sign with nothing on it.

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WORKING THE OYSTER BEDS

© Quinton Gordon

Oyster beds at Union Bay, Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

4x10 inch diptych made with Wista 4x5 camera.

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IN THE FAMILY

You can’t beat brass lenses and wood cameras!

Tintype Portrait Special Today at:

Click on photo above for complete details.

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TINTYPE PORTRAIT STUDIO

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Happening this Saturday only, $50 special pricing on 4x5 Tintype Portraits.

Luz Studios: 2pm to 6pm at 569b Hillside Ave. in Rockbay.

Book online http://www.luzstudios.com/tintype or drop in.

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